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Peer-Reviewed Publications

Klebsiella pneumoniae prevents spore germination and hyphal development of Aspergillus species.

Nogueira MF, Pereira L, Jenull S, Kuchler K, Lion T

Sci Rep. 2019 Jan 18;9(1):218

Abstract Different bacteria and fungi live as commensal organisms as part of the human microbiota, but shifts to a pathogenic state potentially leading to septic infections commonly occur in immunocompromised individuals. Several studies have reported synergistic or antagonistic interactions between individual bacteria and fungi which might be of clinical relevance. Here, we present first evidence for the interaction between Klebsiella pneumoniae and several Aspergillus species including A. fumigatus, A. terreus, A. niger and A. flavus which cohabit in the lungs and the intestines. Microbiological and molecular methods were employed to investigate the interaction in vitro, and the results indicate that Klebsiella pneumoniae is able to prevent Aspergillus spp. spore germination and hyphal development. The inhibitory effect is reversible, as demonstrated by growth recovery of Aspergillus spp. upon inhibition or elimination of the bacteria, and is apparently dependent on the physical interaction with metabolically active bacteria. Molecular analysis of Klebsiella-Aspergillus interaction has shown upregulation of Aspergillus cell wall-related genes and downregulation of hyphae-related genes, suggesting that Klebsiella induces cell wall stress response mechanisms and suppresses filamentous growth. Characterization of polymicrobial interactions may provide the basis for improved clinical management of mixed infections by setting the stage for appropriate diagnostics and ultimately for optimized treatment strategies.
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PMID: 30659217 [PubMed - in process]

Peer-Reviewed Publications authored by Karl Kuchler from Pubmed Logo at the NCBI.
 
Karl Kuchler Laboratory, Medical University Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Medical Biochemistry,
Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/2, A-1030 Vienna, AUSTRIA, [T] +43/1/4277-61806, [F] +43/1/4277-9618, [E] karl.kuchler@meduniwien.ac.at